UKLA announces the shortlist for the Academic Book Award 2018

 photo

UKLA is pleased to announce the shortlist for the 2018 Academic Book Award

The four books selected for the shortlist all make distinctive and very different contributions to the field. Subjects include: film, storytelling, writer identity and digital media. Bulman makes a persuasive case for the inclusion of film in the primary curriculum; Cremin et al explore and theorise Vivien Paley’s storytelling approach in convincing detail; Cremin & Locke capture a moment in time, outlining and theorising perceptions from a number of countries about the importance of teachers as writers; and finally, Potter and McDougall address the concept of ‘third space’ literacies in a wide-ranging discussion about critical issues for literacy in the digital age.

The shortlist was chosen by UKLA Membership and Awards committee, and the final panel will be chaired by Morag Styles, Emeritus Fellow, Homerton College, University of Cambridge.

The winner is announced at the UKLA International Conference in Cardiff, July 6 to July 8 2018


Shortlist: UKLA Academic Book Award 2018

  • Jeannie Hill Bulman: Children's Reading of Film and Visual Literacy in the Primary Curriculum:A Progression Framework Model (Palgrave Macmillan)
  • T.Cremin, R.Flewitt, B.Mardell & J.Swann (eds) Storytelling in Early Childhood: Enriching Language, Literacy & Classroom Culture (Routledge)
  • Teresa Cremin and Terry Locke: Writer Identity and the Teaching and Learning of Writing (Routledge)
  • John Potter and Julian McDougall: Digital Media, Culture and Education: Theorising Third Space Literacies (Palgrave Macmillan)

Jeannie Hill Bulman: Children's Reading of Film and Visual Literacy in the Primary Curriculum:A Progression Framework Model (Palgrave Macmillan)

This book deepens and extends previous work on using film and developing visual literacy within the primary curriculum. It is especially important because of the neglect of this area within the 2013 English National Curriculum. The book not only provides a progression framework for reading film texts, but also makes a useful distinction between learning from film e.g. to support writing, and learning about film in its own right. Both these aspects are important contributions to practice within the current contemporary cultural context where children are bombarded with these texts and need to understand how they can be manipulated by them.

T.Cremin, R.Flewitt, B.Mardell & J.Swann (eds) (2017) Storytelling in Early Childhood: Enriching Language, Literacy & Classroom Culture (Routledge)

In this volume Cremin, Flewitt, Mardell and Swann explore Vivien Paley’s storytelling and story acting approach. Going beyond description of practice, they build a convincing rationale for its effectiveness, unpicking underlying pedagogical principles and linking these to well-respected theories of child learning (such as those of Vygotsky). The combination of US and UK examples not only brings out interesting philosophical differences in the way Paley’s ideas have been construed and adapted, but also draws attention to the tension between current educational policy advocating formal skills and pre-literacy teaching, and the more creative and child-centred ‘play’ approaches advocated by Paley. Thus, more thansimply presenting an account of the method, helpful to new practitioners, there is challenge to more experienced practitioners not only to reflect on their practice, but also to consider their concept of what a narrative is and what might be accepted or expected of stories told by children of pre-school age.

Teresa Cremin,and Terry Locke: Writer Identity and the Teaching and Learning of Writing (Routledge)

This book gives a worldwide perspective on the importance of teachers as writers in developing student writing. It includes recent research that shows the powerful impact a teacher as writer alongside students can have, thereby capturing a moment in time when teachers across the world are trying to establish their writer identity. The wide range of research studies considered offer perspectives from different types of writers, and thus encouraging reflection on personal writer identity. An engaging read, it is an important book for lecturers, teachers and their students as it gives a real insight into this aspect of pedagogy.

John Potter and Julian McDougall: Digital Media, Culture and Education Theorising Third Space Literacies (Palgrave Macmillan)

This book is distinctive in that it brings together research around third space theory and dynamic literacies. Evidence based research is threaded throughout the text; thoroughly reviewed and critiqued with an interesting section on curation. This is discussed further in the dialogue exchange at the end of the book with contributions by Neil Selwyn and Cathy Burnett. The fascinating case studies and applications should inspire digital literacy teaching. The book speaks to a range of readers, extending their knowledge and understanding of media literacy and how technology can enhance pedagogy.


Notes for Editors

The UKLA Academic Book Award is presented yearly for a recently published academic text about the teaching of English for teachers, students, consultants or HE tutors. The panel looks for books that make a lasting, significant contribution to the teaching of English.

Specifically, the award is given to a text which fulfils many of the following criteria.

The text:

  • makes a distinctive contribution to literacy education
  • inspires the teaching of literacy
  • is based on sound literacy research
  • will be a lasting and rich resource for teachers, teacher educators and students
  • encourages teachers, teacher educators and students to be reflective, innovative and creative
  • is accessibly written
  • can be for any or all key stages from early years to KS5
  • is relevant to classroom practice
  • if an edited collection, has a clear editorial voice

Details of past winners are on-line at: https://ukla.org/awards/ukla-academic-book-award


News Archives