UKLA is pleased to announce the shortlist for the 2019 Academic Book Award

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The five books selected for the shortlist all make unique contributions to the field. Two are edited collections: Arizpe & Cliff Hodges and Daly & Limbrick both explore, in very different ways, the centrality of reading in young people’s lives across a range of countries. Two focus on classroom practice in the teaching of literacy: Burnett and Merchant examine ways in which new media technologies have implications now for literacy provision in schools, while Bearne and Reedy draw together theory and practice about reading, writing and spoken language, illustrating their account with vibrant examples of classroom practice. Finally, Jones presents her longitudinal research into literacy lives in an age of austerity.

The shortlist was chosen by the UKLA Membership and Awards committee. The final panel will be chaired by Morag Styles, Emeritus Fellow, Homerton College, University of Cambridge.

The winner will be announced at the UKLA International Conference in Sheffield July 12-14th, 2019

Shortlist: UKLA Academic Book Award 2019

  • Evelyn Arizpe and Gabrielle Cliff Hodges (eds): Young People Reading: Empirical Research across International Contexts (Routledge)
  • Eve Bearne and David Reedy: Teaching Primary English: Subject Knowledge and Classroom Practice
  • (Routledge)
  • Cathy Burnett and Guy Merchant: New Media in the Classroom: Rethinking Primary Literacy (Sage)
  • Nicola Daly and Libby Limbrick (eds), (Advisory Editor Pam Dix): Children's Literature in a Multiliterate World (UCL IOE Press, UCL Institute of Education)
  • Susan Jones: Portraits of Everyday Literacy for Social Justice (Palgrave Macmillan)

Young People Reading: Empirical Research across International Contexts Evelyn Arizpe and Gabrielle Cliff Hodges (eds)( Routledge)

This is a fascinating, skilfully edited collection of small-scale qualitative research projects investigating the reading of young people. Emphasis is placed on both the research methodology and the findings of the studies. Uniquely, Arizpe and Cliff Hodges bring together contributors from five continents. A number of the accounts are of young people’s reading lives in frightening worlds. All reference the centrality of literature in the lives of young people to help make sense of identity. This collection adds to understanding of the role of literacy in an uncertain world.

Teaching Primary English: Subject Knowledge and Classroom Practice Eve Bearne and David Reedy (Routledge)

A highly informed and principled book, this volume draws together theory and practice in an accessible way. Written in three parts focusing on Spoken language, reading and writing, the authors back up the theory with vibrant examples from schools. The book is accompanied by an excellent website with video clips from within the classroom and downloadable resources to support the primary English teacher.

New Media in the Classroom: Rethinking Primary Literacy Cathy Burnett and Guy Merchant (Sage)

In New Media in the Classroom Cathy Burnett and Guy Merchant explore how the rise of New Media technologies has changed the ways in which children engage with texts and how this has implications for literacy provision in schools. In their ‘Charter for 21st Century Literacies’ they reflect on key principles for learning and teaching literacies in the digital age. With nuanced discussions of relevant research and examples of classroom practice, they emphasise the importance of building on children’s experience in and out of school, considering how to build practices that support children to draw on multiple modes and media so that they develop collaborative, creative and critical practice around digital media and meaning-making.

Children's Literature in a Multiliterate World Nicola Daly and Libby Limbrick (eds) (UCL IOE Press, UCL Institute of Education)

This book is made up of twelve articles, originally given as presentations at the International Board of Books for Young People's Congress in 2016. These articles are a powerful exploration of story, identity, culture and heritage from a wide range of non-European cultures. They show the significant role that children's literature can play in developing self-knowledge, empathy and intercultural understanding.

Portraits of Everyday Literacy for Social Justice Susan Jones (Palgrave Macmillan)

This is a beautifully written book that combines theoretical discussion about the framing of literacy, and thus what it means to be literate, with the stories from families living in an age of austerity. It skilfully spotlights the intersection between politics, social justice and literacy and so challenges the dominant rhetoric about being literate. This is a ‘good read’ whether you are interested in literacy, social justice or the stories of real people in real places. 


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