Publications

Journal Access

As a logged-in member of UKLA you have full access to Literacy and the Journal of Research in Reading.

UKLA believes that reading teachers are teachers who read and readers who teach.
UKLA believes that standard English is just one dialect of English.
UKLA believes that children learn to spell through reading, writing and talking about words.
UKLA believes that comprehension involves what the reader brings to the text as well as what the reader understands from the text.
Punctuation shows how to read words and sentences on a page.
UKLA believes that speaking more than one language is an asset.
UKLA believes that grammar is about how people make sense in speaking or writing.
UKLA believes that drama is both a creative activity in its own right and a vehicle for learning.
UKLA believes that despite the rich diversity of humankind, certain groups are privileged in terms of literacy.
UKLA believes that children and young people need to engage confidently, creatively and critically in a wide range of digital media practices.
UKLA believes that being able to read critically and analytically is vital in contemporary society.
UKLA believes that enjoying reading is the right of all children.
In October 2019, a consultation was launched on proposals for changes to the statutory framework for the early years foundation stage in England.
This is the first article in a new series that demonstrates how grammar can be taught in a rich literature context. The first of the series is being provided as a free resource to coincide with the UKLA Grammar conference. Further resources will be provided on the member’s site. In this first paper, the wonderful book by Carol Ann Duffy called Lost Happy Endings can be used to teach quality grammar in context for a variety of year groups. At the heart of the project was the determination that grammar should be taught in context and through high quality books. Having worked with schools on grammar training in the locality, it had become clear that many teachers lacked the knowledge of what grammar could be explored through real books.
In this edition of UKLA News we discover more about the UKLA Literacy Schools of the Year 2019 and read about author and illustrator Chris Riddell's Desert Island Books.
Rapid technological change has meant that everyday practices surrounding reading and writing have shifted significantly over the last 20 years.
See the full shortlists for the UKLA Book Awards 2019 
Independent publishers dominate in 10th anniversary yearSarah Crossan scores a second win with her novel co-authored with Brian ConaghanInformation text shares the first ever joint award for 7-11 year oldsDebut artist on debut list triumphs in the 3-6 category
This series of online resources looks at issues related to social diversity through a range of picture books. The term diversity can be used to cover a number of social categories including, but not limited to, representations and identity, ethnicity, sexuality, gender orientation, family setting and housing. The series aims to increase the range of picture books being shared in EYFS and KS1 classrooms by introducing picture books that explore ideas related to diversity. 
This series of online resources looks at issues related to social diversity through a range of picture books. The term diversity can be used to cover a number of social categories including, but not limited to, representations and identity, ethnicity, sexuality, gender orientation, family setting and housing. The series aims to increase the range of picture books being shared in EYFS and KS1 classrooms by introducing picture books that explore ideas related to diversity. 
This series of online resources looks at issues related to social diversity through a range of picture books. The term diversity can be used to cover a number of social categories including, but not limited to, representations and identity, ethnicity, sexuality, gender orientation, family setting and housing. The series aims to increase the range of picture books being shared in EYFS and KS1 classrooms by introducing picture books that explore ideas related to diversity. 
This series of online resources looks at issues related to social diversity through a range of picture books. The term diversity can be used to cover a number of social categories including, but not limited to, representations and identity, ethnicity, sexuality, gender orientation, family setting and housing. The series aims to increase the range of picture books being shared in EYFS and KS1 classrooms by introducing picture books that explore ideas related to diversity. 
In this edition read about teachers participating in the UKLA Book Awards, our UKLA Ambassador to Brunei Malai Zeiti Sheikh Abdul Hamid, new competitions and events across the UK.
This is a chapter from the UKLA publication Literacy and Community: developing a primary curriculum through partnerships. It describes how a class teacher and a literacy consultant in a multilingual school in Birmingham developed a teaching sequence to explore identity and citizenship. The teacher, Katie Palmer, is now Deputy Head Teacher and Curriculum and Assessment Leader, and the school now has 356 children on roll. The book Literacy and Community invites readers to reflect on their own practice and the chapter ends with some prompt questions. If you find this article interesting, why not look in the UKLA bookshop for Literacy and Community for examples of partnerships with homes, parents and communities throughout the primary age range.

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