Free Resources for non-members

Created by members of the Teaching Writing SIG, this questionnaire is intended as a self-review tool for both teachers and pre-service teachers.
Share this page with pupils and their parents to hear a new story read aloud every day during half-term, from Monday 15th to Friday 19th February 2021.
UKLA’s selection of recommended books that educate on black culture and promote voices of black authors in literacy for readers of all ages.
View one of our past magazine issues included below to see the useful content that you can expect from this publication as a UKLA member.
UKLA’s selection of recommended books that promote diversity in literacy for readers of all ages.
UKLA’s suggestions for books that connect with and celebrate LGBTQ+ lives, history and experiences.
This webinar offers ways of building literacy teaching and research around photography as a powerful emotional and intellectual way into meaning making.
Developing a Culturally Inclusive Curriculum by Jane Bednall, Sharon Fell and Niv CuloraThis UKLA online professional development resource is designed to support schools in developing a culturally inclusive curriculum.
CLPE released its second Reflecting Realities report on 19 September 2019. The Reflecting Realities: Survey of Ethnic Representation within UK Children’s Literature 2018 shows that there has been an increased presence of BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) characters in children’s books published in 2018, compared to the previous year. This is the second year the survey has been conducted in the UK, with the aim of identifying and highlighting representation within picture books, fiction and non-fiction for ages 3 – 11.
In this presentation with a Q&A, Julia Gillen explains why it is reasonable to call Edwardian picture postcards social media.

In this video I explore how close reading in the secondary English classroom might be approached from a critical literacy perspective by engaging with language, literacy, and power.

This talk explains why heritage language development is important, and how everyday school literacy practices can be adapted to include multilingualism.

Here are our suggestions for on and off line activities for all ages. 

This is the first article in a new series that demonstrates how grammar can be taught in a rich literature context. The first of the series is being provided as a free resource to coincide with the UKLA Grammar conference. Further resources will be provided on the member’s site. In this first paper, the wonderful book by Carol Ann Duffy called Lost Happy Endings can be used to teach quality grammar in context for a variety of year groups. At the heart of the project was the determination that grammar should be taught in context and through high quality books. Having worked with schools on grammar training in the locality, it had become clear that many teachers lacked the knowledge of what grammar could be explored through real books.
This is a chapter from the UKLA publication Literacy and Community: developing a primary curriculum through partnerships. It describes how a class teacher and a literacy consultant in a multilingual school in Birmingham developed a teaching sequence to explore identity and citizenship. The teacher, Katie Palmer, is now Deputy Head Teacher and Curriculum and Assessment Leader, and the school now has 356 children on roll. The book Literacy and Community invites readers to reflect on their own practice and the chapter ends with some prompt questions. If you find this article interesting, why not look in the UKLA bookshop for Literacy and Community for examples of partnerships with homes, parents and communities throughout the primary age range.
This article is an updated version of a chapter from the UKLA publication Beyond Words: Developing children’s response to multimodal texts where teachers in a multilingual school in Birmingham introduced children to multimodal texts through reading and making comic strip stories. Since this chapter was first written, the school has grown so that there are now 938 children on roll including the Nursery, and the Assistant Head Sarah Abraham is now Deputy Head Dr Sarah Allen.
In an extended cross-curricular project, Years 3 and 4 create a poem scroll based on a traditional Bengali form of poetic narrative. Through drama, discussion and close examination of the original poem, the children came to understand the horrors of the tsunami and wrote and illustrated their own narrative poem, which they made into a scroll.
In this article, Rebecca Kennedy describes how a year 2 teacher has planned and taught a sequence of literacy lessons for young writers, with cross curricular links to geography and art. 

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