238 results

Further critiques of the phonics test

by Margaret Clark

Under the Freedom of Information Act, Margaret Clark has discovered the costs for the phonics test and the phonics ‘catalogue’ offer to schools. Download her articles ‘Whose knowledge counts in Government literacy policies and at what cost?’ from Education Journal 186 and ‘The impact of an IMPACT pamphlet: on decoding synthetic phonics’ from Education Journal 188 below, as well and the IMPACT pamphlet on decoding synthetic phonics by Andrew Davis. Our thanks to Demitri Coryton for permission to publish these.

UKLA Book Awards

UKLA Book Awards Winners 2017.

The unique UKLA Book Awards are the only awards judged entirely by teachers. Discover the 2017 winners here. 

Books for Keeps

Trouble Next Door

by Chris Higgins

In this popular series, the published Book for Keeps review of Trouble Next Door is combined with a summary of the key themes in the book, some teaching ideas, and connections to other stories that teachers may find useful.

English 4-11

Bookmaking with two illustrators

by Kerenza Ghosh, Fiona Collins

In a project designed for inclusion, illustrators Mark Long and Mark Oliver worked with a Year 5 class on an extended project where each child produced their own illustrated book. Children with additional educational needs and children in the early stages of learning English were able to access the work and proudly create their own picturebooks.   

Thanks to The English Association for allowing UKLA to reproduce the article.

Synthetic Phonics and Baseline Assessment

by Margaret Clark

For many years UKLA member Margaret M. Clark has consistently challenged the evidence base for claims made by the UK government that synthetic phonics should be used as the method to teach all children how to read. UKLA members have been grateful for Margaret's tireless efforts to hold governments to account on this crucial issue and for her work questioning the value of a phonics check with a pass/fail score administered to children in Year 1 in England.

In this new article, first published in the Education Journal in March 2017, Margaret explores the extent that synthetic phonics and baseline assessment can be said to be value for money in a time of austerity.

We are grateful to Margaret Clark and the Education Journal for allowing us to share this article with our members.

English 4-11

Finding the Joy in reading and writing: teaching literacy in PRUs.

by Carol Tribe, Helen Watt, Andrew Lambirth, Susanna Steele

This article describes how two teachers in pupil referral units used writing journals, storytelling and quality picturebooks to encourage reluctant learners to write with enthusiasm and find success in creating their own stories. The teachers were delighted about gains in self-esteem as well as in reading and writing achievement and the article recommends particular texts which helped tackle sensitive issues.

Thanks to The English Association for allowing UKLA to reproduce the article.

English 4-11

The Multimodal literacy project: supporting looked after children

by Petula Bhojwani, Liz Kitts

A project in Nottinghamshire has for some time supported home-school links for families caring for looked after children. Each child is given a multimodal kit with carefully selected resources and suggested activities to take home in the autumn term and to keep regardless of change in school or home setting. Carers are given support to help them encourage the children to create their own multimodal books and presentations.

Thanks to The English Association for allowing UKLA to reproduce the article.

English 4-11

Chatsworth road: an after school video project

by Jane Speare

Children from two primary schools in the London borough of Hackney took part in a community arts funded project which investigated the history of the local high street, discovering a great deal about the cultural richness of the area. The active, investigative nature of the project challenged the participants but was particularly successful with children who had previously been seen as reluctant or disaffected learners.

Thanks to The English Association for allowing UKLA to reproduce the article.

English 4-11

On the Same Page

by Alexandra Strick, Sean Stockdale

This article reviews books which include issues of disability as part of ‘usual’ characterisation and plot but where the child characters are not defined by their disability or learning difficulty. It offers a good starting point for selecting inclusive reading material with lists of books and useful websites.

Thanks to The English Association for allowing UKLA to reproduce the article.

English 4-11

On the Same Page

by Alexandra Strick, Sean Stockdale

This article reviews books which include issues of disability as part of ‘usual’ characterisation and plot but where the child characters are not defined by their disability or learning difficulty. It offers a good starting point for selecting inclusive reading material with lists of books and useful websites.

Thanks to The English Association for allowing UKLA to reproduce the article.

English 4-11

Inspiration: cross curricular literacy

by Janette Catton

In a school where over 47 different languages are spoken and there is a higher than average proportion of children who have additional educational needs, the staff developed cross-curricular projects as a basis for developing whole school literacy policy. This highly illustrated article describes the inspirational work of years 2 and 5.

Thanks to The English Association for allowing UKLA to reproduce the article.

English 4-11

Inspiration: cross curricular literacy

by Janette Catton

In a school where over 47 different languages are spoken and there is a higher than average proportion of children who have additional educational needs, the staff developed cross-curricular projects as a basis for developing whole school literacy policy. This highly illustrated article describes the inspirational work of years 2 and 5.

Thanks to The English Association for allowing UKLA to reproduce the article.