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18 results for Free resources

Grammar in its Place…Putting the teaching of grammar back in to the heart of books

This is the first article in a new series that demonstrates how grammar can be taught in a rich literature context. The first of the series is being provided as a free resource to coincide with the UKLA Grammar conference. Further resources will be provided on the member’s site. In this first paper, the wonderful book by Carol Ann Duffy called Lost Happy Endings can be used to teach quality grammar in context for a variety of year groups. At the heart of the project was the determination that grammar should be taught in context and through high quality books. Having worked with schools on grammar training in the locality, it had become clear that many teachers lacked the knowledge of what grammar could be explored through real books.

Building understanding, sharing identities

This is a chapter from the UKLA publication Literacy and Community: developing a primary curriculum through partnerships. It describes how a class teacher and a literacy consultant in a multilingual school in Birmingham developed a teaching sequence to explore identity and citizenship. The teacher, Katie Palmer, is now Deputy Head Teacher and Curriculum and Assessment Leader, and the school now has 356 children on roll. The book Literacy and Community invites readers to reflect on their own practice and the chapter ends with some prompt questions. If you find this article interesting, why not look in the UKLA bookshop for Literacy and Community for examples of partnerships with homes, parents and communities throughout the primary age range.

It’s Seriously Comic - a Year 2 Case Study

This article is an updated version of a chapter from the UKLA publication Beyond Words: Developing children’s response to multimodal texts where teachers in a multilingual school in Birmingham introduced children to multimodal texts through reading and making comic strip stories. Since this chapter was first written, the school has grown so that there are now 938 children on roll including the Nursery, and the Assistant Head Sarah Abraham is now Deputy Head Dr Sarah Allen.

English 4-11

The Tsunami project: writing narrative poetry

by Sukhvinder Bhoday, Jane Bednall

In an extended cross-curricular project, Years 3 and 4 create a poem scroll based on a traditional Bengali form of poetic narrative. Through drama, discussion and close examination of the original poem, the children came to understand the horrors of the tsunami and wrote and illustrated their own narrative poem, which they made into a scroll.

No secret: using good models to write narrative in Year 2

by Rebecca Kennedy

In this article, Rebecca Kennedy describes how a year 2 teacher has planned and taught a sequence of literacy lessons for young writers, with cross curricular links to geography and art. 

Free Resources

UKLA Book Awards 10th Anniversary Film

A film by UKLA to celebrate the UKLA Book Awards 10th Anniversary. UKLA representatives talk about their favourite books from the past 10 years of the award.

CPD

Developing a Culturally Inclusive Curriculum

by Jane Bednall, Sharon Fell, Niv Culora

Developing a Culturally Inclusive Curriculum by Jane Bednall, Sharon Fell and Niv Culora

This UKLA online professional development resource is designed to support schools in developing a culturally inclusive curriculum.

The materials aim to:

  • develop an understanding of how the culturally relevant curriculum is beneficial to all pupils
  • suggest ways to build on the language and cultural assets pupils bring from their home and community experience to strengthen learning
  • explore how the curriculum can reflect the cultural and linguistic diversity of society
  • encourage the use of a diverse range of texts and texts types that across a year of teaching will represent all aspects of pupils’ cultures, faiths, sexuality, diverse families etc. so that they will recognise themselves in the texts, learn empathetically about each other and will feel safe to bring their own stories into the classroom
  • suggest ways of adapting planning, teaching and learning to be inclusive for pupils who are learning English as an additional language or pupils from Minority Ethnic groups
  • explore how a culturally diverse approach to teaching can raise achievement.

In developing a culturally inclusive curriculum, nobody is expected to be the expert. Teachers, trainees, pupils and communities can draw on one another’s experience and expertise and create a curriculum that represents everyone’s stories, rather than just the story of the dominant few. By opening up thinking and moving away from a Eurocentric curriculum, teachers can explore intercultural perspectives with pupils, developing young people’s active interest in the world and their relationships to it.

UKLA is grateful to the London Borough of Newham and Mishti Chatterji of Mantra Lingua Press for permission to reproduce parts of the book Developing a Culturally Inclusive Curriculum (2008).

CPD

CLPE Reading and Writing Scales

Formative assessment scales for reading and writing. These new formative assessment scales are written for the teaching profession by the teaching profession to support assessment of reading and writing in the new national curriculum. These tools will support progression and inform classroom practice in the 21st Century. They have been developed by CLPE in partnership with UKLA, NATE, NAAE and the English Media Centre and include the informative 'Research Towards a Comprehensive Pedagogy for Reading and Writing' document collated by UKLA members Henrietta Dombey, Fiona Maine and Andrew Lambirth

CPD

Curriculum and Assessment in English 3 to 19: A Better Plan

by John Richmond

CLPE, NAAE, NATE and UKLA have come together to make a common statement about the curriculum and assessment in English across the whole school age-range. This statement is made up of 6 PDFs available to download.

CPD

Promoting Reading for Pleasure

by Polly Atkinson

A specially commissioned resource designed to support parents and carers as they help their children to enjoy reading. Written by UKLA member Polly Atkinson, a highly experienced literacy educator based in school. While they are designed for parents and carers, you may find them helpful for discussion with teacher colleagues, student teachers and other practitioners.

CPD

Reading for Pleasure

by Teresa Cremin

This article by Teresa Cremin has been developed for the National College discussion on wider reading and reading for pleasure.