Tag: classic literature

Taking as its starting point a selection of surveys and policy documents before moving to consider views from theorists, writers and young readers, this article seeks to stimulate debate about why reading literature as part of the curriculum still matters.
This UKLA project was planned in response to recurring evidence that suggests children in England continue to read less independently and find less pleasure in reading than many of their peers in other countries (Twist et al., 2003; 2007).

Contemporary approaches to classic text – H.G Wells’ War of the Worlds

Gill Robins outlines the elaborate project she undertook to read a classic novel by moving away from the single subject discipline and creating a scenario that engaged and enthused children. It also gave them choices, which produced a strong engagement with contemporary media rather than written language. She concludes by asking the question: was it a success?Thanks to the English Association for allowing UKLA to reproduce the article.

Contemporary approaches to classic text – William Shakespeare’s Macbeth

Shakespeare is increasingly studied in primary schools, and Gill Robins shows how a contemporary approach is a rich experience of communication in many forms, providing an introduction to the subject that enhances children’s experience when meeting Shakespeare as a set text in Year 7.Thanks to the English Association for allowing UKLA to reproduce the article.

Contemporary approaches to classic text – Beowulf

Gill Robins explores the Anglo-Saxon epic ‘Beowulf’ with a class of Year 5 children. Describing how exploratory talk lays the foundation of the project, she goes on to evaluate the children’s multi-media responses to a timeless tale of good and evil. The article concludes with a reflection on the quality and value of the learning which these projects have prompted.

Thanks to the English Association for allowing UKLA to reproduce the article.

Wordsworth and the need to save the planet

This article is about teaching Wordsworth in the secondary school. David Whitley explores the links between nature and texts.

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